Saturday, October 13, 2012

One That Got Left Behind (VEGAN MOFO: DAY 13)

Here's a little something that I made that never made it to my blog, despite being delicious.  It's Penne with Artichokes, Walnuts, and Olives from Quick Fix Vegan by Robin Robertson, a book that has never let me down during the short time I've had it so far -- the recipes are, indeed, easy, quick, and like in this case, something I could make using stuff I already had in my pantry.  I stock my pantry insanely-full, though, maybe other people have to go to the store to pick up a can of artichokes or something.
This would be a great potluck recipe.  It's good both hot and cold, and inexpensive to make.  Of course, I made it just to eat myself, and did, right before I started making the effort to eat mostly whole veggies.  Still, this isn't terrible on the health front.  I used whole wheat pasta at least.  It only has 2 tablespoons of added oil in the whole thing (but 3 of white wine, which, to me, instantly indicates a delicious recipe).  Over some leafy greens, I'd still be pretty into eating this.

Just for fun, I took the book The Engine 2 Diet by Rip Esselstyn from the library recently.  He sure doesn't need to convince me that a plant-strong, whole-foods diet without animal protein is the way to go, so I just skimmed the first sections and went straight to the recipes.  I like that he's got fat free salad dressing recipes in there.

The only thing I made from it so far, though, has been his Healthy Homemade Hummus, which contains no tahini or oil and, therefore, no fat.  But guess what?  It tasted pretty bad.  So I added about a tablespoon of tahini and a teaspoon of oil, as well as about a cup of kalamata olives.  Now it's OK, and still far lower in fat than most hummus.  I think I'll stick with full-fat hummus, although he's got me convinced I can lower the fat by adding some water or veggie broth instead of the entire amounts of oil or tahini called for.

His recipe ideas are certainly nothing new for the already-vegan crowd, but it's still interesting to look through it.  But I would recommend to anyone who wants to follow this type of diet to pick up The Happy Herbivore instead, because it comes out of the blogging world, where creating delicious and creative recipes is so highly-valued, rather than out of the diet world, where it's most important to just have recipes that precisely fit the bill of what is called for in that diet.

6 comments:

  1. I'll have to dig out Robin's books more often! That penne dish calls out to me! ;)
    Thanks on the feedback of the E2 book, I was wondering if that's one worth to purchase or not.. So far I've printed out the free recipes from their website! LOL Since I have Lindsay's books (the 3rd pre-ordered), I guess I can relax, huh? ;)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yeah, I'd say it's time to relax. I only have her first book, but I've got book 2 on reserve when it's available from the library. Have I mentioned how much I love the library? I friggin' love the library.

      Delete
  2. you're making this for the next drag soup potluck, right?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ahhhh hahaha maybe, depending on the theme!

      Delete
  3. 'Quick-Fix Vegan' is one of my faves. I have a soft spot for Robin Robertson, who is truly the most prolific of vegan cookbook authors. I feel like she taught me how to cook, since 'Vegan Planet' was the first vegan cookbook that I ever owned or cooked from (back in 2003.) I'll have to try the penne recipe that you posted about, it sounds like another one of her gems : )
    --Tara

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. She's really prolific, and also really consistent. I mean, she impresses me often. I definitely first learned to cook from Moskowitz/Romero, but every cookbook teaches me something new.

      Delete

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...